These itineraries will lead us to a deeper understanding of the secrets of the greatest civilization born in Italy before Rome:
the Etruscan Civilization.
For centuries the Etruscans remained enveloped in mystery, a people surrounded by a magic aura. The Romans named them probably after a Latin verb meaning "to sacrifice", owing to their frequency in making sacrifices to the gods. They called themselves Rasenna, while the Greeks called them Tyrrhenioi. The Etruscans gave much to Rome including three kings of the Tarquini dynasty…
ITINERARY 1
The Etruscan necropolis of Cerveteri,
Etruscan architecture,
the great Mausoleums.
ITINERARY 2
The necropolis of Tarquinia, Etruscan painting,
wall decorations.
ITINERARY 3
The Etruscan Museum in Rome.
The Etruscan necropolis of Cerveteri,
Etruscan architecture,
the great Mausoleums.


Here we are in one of the most fascinating and mysterious archeological site of the area surrounding Rome: the Etruscan Necropolis of Cerveteri. Nothing is left of the ancient town, except for the architectural richness of the town of the dead which, with its tombs and sepulchral monuments, lets us imagine how extraordinary the town of the living could be. We shall visit the Tomb of the painted Lions, the Tomb of the Shields and the Chairs, the Tomb of the Reliefs, just to mention some of the great mausoleums typical of the Cerveteri Necropolis…
The necropolis of Tarquinia,
Etruscan painting and
wall decorations.







We arrive at the huge archaeological park of the ancient Etruscan town of Tarquinia to immediately discover what is hidden underneath: a very large number of tombs dating back to the 6th and 7th century BC. Long and narrow stairs take us deeper and deeper into the “Reign of the Dead” of a great civilization, into their tombs where, by contrast, there are brilliant colours everywhere. Here, we shall penetrate the Tomb of the Jugglers, the Tomb of the Lionesses, the Tomb of Hunting and Fishing and many others. Their wall decorations lead our imagination towards a somewhat remote civilization, of whose life nothing is left apart from the objects connected to the cult of death…
The Etruscan Museum
in Valle Giulia







We enter Villa Giulia, an elegant residence built in the 16th century according to the will of Pope Julius III, and today the seat of the Etruscan Museum. The objects and statues it hosts bear witness to the civilizations living in the Latium territory long before the Romans. The most significant works come from the Etruscan world, e.g. the Sarcophagus of the Bride and Bridegroom, bearing on its cover a life-size image of the woman and the man who were once housed in this sarcophagus, the Pyrgi Tablets, three golden tablets written in Phoenician and Etruscan languages, and the charming painted terracotta Apollo Statue. All belonging to the 6th century BC as are all the other works we are going to see…
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